Philippine Cuisines


Cooking methods
Philippines Cuisine

The Filipino/Tagalog words for popular cooking methods and terms are listed below:

"Adobo/Inadobo" − cooked in vinegar, oil, garlic and soy sauce.
"Babad/Binabad/Ibinabad" − to marinate.
"Banli/Binanlian/Pabanli" − blanched.
"Bagoong/Binagoongan/ – sa Bagoong" − cooked with fermented fish paste bagoong.
"Binalot" – literally "wrapped." This generally refers to dishes wrapped in banana leaves, pandan leaves, or even aluminum foil. The wrapper is generally inedible (in contrast to lumpia — see below).
"Buro/Binuro" − fermented.
"Daing/Dinaing/Padaing" − marinated with garlic, vinegar, and black peppers. Sometimes dried and usually fried before eating.
"Guinataan/sa Gata" − cooked with coconut milk.
"Guisa/Guisado/Ginisa" or "Gisado" − sautéed with garlic, onions and/or tomatoes.
"Halabos/Hinalabos" – mostly for shellfish. Steamed in their own juices and sometimes carbonated soda.
"Hilaw/Sariwa" – unripe (for fruits and vegetables), raw (for meats). Also used for uncooked food in general (as in lumpiang sariwa).
"Hinurno" – baked in an oven or roasted.
"Ihaw/Inihaw" − grilled over coals.
"Kinilaw" or "Kilawin" − fish or seafood marinated in vinegar or calamansi juice along with garlic, onions, ginger, tomato, peppers.
"Laga/Nilaga/Palaga" − boiled/braised.
"Nilasing" − cooked with an alcoholic beverage like wine or beer.
"Lechon/Litson/Nilechon" − roasted on a spit.
"Lumpia" – wrapped with an edible wrapper.
"Minatamis" − sweetened.
"Pinakbet" − to cook with vegetables usually with sitaw (yardlong beans), calabaza, talong (eggplant), and ampalaya (bitter melon) among others and bagoong.
"Paksiw/Pinaksiw" − cooked in vinegar.
"Pangat/Pinangat" − boiled in salted water with fruit such as tomatoes or ripe mangoes.
"Palaman/Pinalaman" − "filled" as in siopao, though "palaman" also refers to the filling in a sandwich.
"Pinakuluan" – boiled.
"Prito/Pinirito" − fried or deep fried. From the Spanish frito.
"Relleno/Relyeno" – stuffed.
"Tapa/Tinapa" – dried and smoked. Tapa refers to meat treated in this manner, mostly marinated and then dried and fried afterwards. Tinapa meanwhile is almost exclusively associated with smoked fish.
"Sarza/Sarciado" – cooked with a thick sauce.
"Sinangag" – garlic fried rice.
"Sigang/Sinigang" − boiled in a sour broth usually with a tamarind base. Other common souring agents include guava, raw mangoes, calamansi also known as calamondin.
"Tosta/Tinosta/Tostado" – toasted.
"Torta/Tinorta/Patorta" – to cook with eggs in the manner of an omelette.



Philippines Cuisine Characteristics

Filipino cuisine is distinguished by its bold combination of sweet (tamis), sour (asim), and salty (alat) flavors. While other Asian cuisines may be known for a more subtle delivery and presentation, Filipino cuisine is often delivered all at once in a single presentation. More details at Philippines Cuisine Characteristics


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Cooking methods, Beverage, Chilled drinks and shakes, Brewed Beverage, Alcoholic Beverage, References

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